How to deal with criticism

Denial

http://www.digitalbookworld.com/2013/5-ways-for-authors-to-handle-bad-reviews/

This is a pretty touchy-feely article on the interesting subject of how to take criticism.  Good if you want to use this as therapy.  However, if you choose to get your therapy elsewhere (e.g. bibliotherapy – try http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/individual-bibliotherapy/) what are other ways writers can deal with reviews?

1.  Don’t read any of them.  Just ignore them.  Your script editor / book editor / agent / beta reader / higher consciousness will tell you what you need to know.

2.  Choose one person to read them all and tell you the right things at the right time: the good things immediately, and the bad things when you’re clearly strong enough to take it.

3.  Read everything yourself, and career madly from elation to self-loathing before eventually arriving at an equilibrium.

4.  Read everything yourself and believe only the good things.  Carry a pin to deflate your head if you encounter any narrow doorways.

5.  Read everything yourself and believe only the negative things.  Not recommended.

Fans want Control

Casting for 50 Shades

What’s going on with the recent fan protests about the casting of 50 Shades and Batman?  On its own, I’m struggling to be interested in the hoo-ha about 50 Shades (apparently voted the least-desired present for Christmas, and the most likely book to be left behind in a Travelodge).  But, with the Batman protest a few weeks ago, it feels like it might be becoming a phenomenon: fans want control.

But does any actor embody a character as you imagine them?  Mostly, after a while, it’s impossible to imagine the character as anyone else, though.

Playing with audience appetites is a long-established Hollywood game.  Back when Garbo and John Gilbert were the subject of hot gossip, the studio put them in a film with a mischievous title so they could announce they were in Love. 

Maybe this furore is just good advertising.

So, answers please:  Is this significant?  Should an audience be able to affect creative decisions before a book or film is released?

(Incidentally, the picture isn’t an illustration of any fans, just suggested cast.)